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to paris before independence, a time of a new generation. >> they came here in order to improve themselves and to thereby improve their country. >> as for this generation of americans, america's favorite historian is less than enthusiastic. >> we are raising children in america today who by in large historically are ill it illiter. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm byron pitts. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you
a cousin who had been in the women's army corps during world war ii. and she went to paris, and she bought this painting. she is a cat lover. and she paid a few hundred dollars for it. and she was told that it was extremely valuable. and this was in the 1940s? yes, mm-hmm. and i'm not a cat lover. so it's been on my porch for 15 years. and what do you know about it? i know that he was a contemporary of toulouse-lautrec, that he was swiss, and he came to paris in 1881, and he is more noted for his posters. the artist's name is théophile steinlen. and you're absolutely right. he was a contemporary and a friend of toulouse-lautrec's, also a famous poster artist. he was born in switzerland, and in his early 20s, he moved to paris. and he's first working in paris in the 1880s as an illustrator, and soon after that as a poster artist. he did a number of images of workers, and very much had a social agenda in imaging poor people, downtrodden people. but what he's best known for are his posters of parisian nightclubs and theater programs and, of course, the beloved cats. and most of his models ar
turecamo, our man in paris. >> reporter: the latest craze in french dining. hamburger. yeah, the french used to think they were an american scourge: food without flavor or finesse. but they're beginning to see that even a hamburger can be gourmet. i mean just ask victor. he created a restaurant dedicated to the gourmet burger. he did his research criss-crossing america. >> i started in los angeles with a backpack. my only goal was to eat hamburgers. >> reporter: he had been open for a month and the wait for a table was 30 to 45 minutes. then there's another restaurant, a smoking truck. the first gourmet food truck ever in paris. the waiting time here? we're talking about a hamburger. the truck is the brain child of chris ten frederick from l.a. >> i tried to get the most authentic american burger possible. >> reporter: and the french find guilty pleasure eating with their hands. so what makes them gourmet? well, victor worked with an artisan butcher in paris. together they developed >> to get the perfect patty. reporter: chris ten studied french cuisine in paris for several years before
's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> i lived in paris during college so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do is sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine. if you've never been to paris pick an afternoon on a sunny day. these large boats are open air and allow you to see the entire city by sea. for the arts the museum which houses spectacular murals by monet. for shopping head to avenue montiague. the madison avenue of paris. grab your walking shoes and walk up. don't forget to buy a real bagette sandwich. or a crepe on the street. soon you'll feel like a native. it has to work. ♪ make just one someone happy and when it's a toys for tots child, well, what could be more important? so this year, every hasbro toy donated to toys for tots will be powered by duracell. happy holidays. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. tomato, ob
, think about paris. cnn's alina cho tells us why in this week's travel insider. >> reporter: i lived in paris during college, so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do, then and now, sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine at a cafe. the french invented the concept. cafe de flore is my pick. and for dinner, across the street is also great. if you've never been to paris, take an afternoon on a sunny day and ride this boat. they are open air and allow you to see the entire city by sea. for the arts, this museum houses spectacular murals by monet. for shopping head to avenue montaigne, the madison avenue of paris. then, grab your walking shoes, walking all the way up and back down is a great way to work off a meal. and speaking of food, don't forget to buy a real baguette sandwich, or a crepe on the street. soon you'll feel like a native. alina cho, cnn, paris. >>> how old is the big blue planet that we're all living on right now? 10,000 years old? or 4.5 billion years old? the one and only bill nye the science guy will tell us what he thinks. at
dreaming of paris where my grandparents, my grandfather, spend many important years of his life. also i want to move to my place, i don't know what was the name of that place. every time people call me la englicita, the little english woman because in cuba, in the caribbean, they didn't make any difference. all the irish were english. and all the people from asia were chinese. all the jews were called polacos, polish. that is interesting because the irish were part of the spanish community in cuba, but usually they didn't make the difference. so they call me and they call my father el inglis, the english guy. so when they call me that and when my name suffered many different spellings. later on in life, in the 70's, i had many identification cards with names like coffee that i didn't drink at the time, so i began drinking coffee later on, names like caufildo and garfield, my favorite one, that made me wonder if the bureaucrats at the id office knew that i really love cats. without my garfield id, i left havana in 1981 and went to zurich, switzerland, thanks to james joyce. my dancing th
will be able to access the controls. in paris already, they are rounding the pedestrian signals through blue tooth and into people's phones. so the future is really exciting and technology will make it quite a journey for everybody. >> thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> so now i would like to introduce the chief engineer. can you tell us about your experience? >> there were a lot of anticipation about how people would respond. at first, we had to get in front of people to direct them from their habits. early morning, they are more into carrying their coffee and going inside of the elevator and then spilling their coffee to hit the keys. we got right in front of them, stopped them and told them exactly what they had to do. that helped out a lot. the other thing that helped were the lights in the lobby would tell them where the elevator was. a lot of these systems have not done that. we were the first to do that. the nice thing is we've got less spills in the lobby, too. you get into the elevator in the morning, and somebody is standing in front of the buttons and you can
of his deputies vacationing in paris. if you went back to baghdad, you'd be arrested. >> uh, no. nobody will arrest me. they will kill me. [ticking] [camera shutter snaps] >> these surveillance photos were taken by undercover police officers while they watched a team of seven south american thieves clean out an old navy store. >> shirts at $22.50, and they got the whole rack. >> when police moved in to make the arrest, they found enough merchandise to fill a room. all taken in less than an hour without anyone inside the store noticing a thing. [ticking] >> we have never seen a problem of this size and magnitude in world history. >> now hang on. in world history. >> there's more counterfeiting going on in china now than we've ever seen anywhere. >> name an american brand. any brand. any kind of product. just name it, and we'll tell you something about it. it's probably being counterfeited in china as we speak. >> this is the most profitable criminal venture, as far as i know, on earth. >> counterfeiting. >> counterfeiting and your partners don't kill you. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc
to paris tonight explaining how you can, too. >> just moments ago, the national park service verified this cross stood over mojave desert in southern california missing two years now. the subject of a battle. we found it today on the peninsula. good evening. >> we sent a camera to the scene after getting a tip and found that missing cross on skyline boulevard in san mateo county. david louie is there and joins us live to pick up the story. david? >> what a story it is. this cross is famous and it's been the subject of a lawsuit over 10 years that went to the u.s. supreme court over the separation of church and state. nobody knows how long
and mcconnell to actually sit together. >> it was like arranging the paris pease talks or the camp david talks. it wasn't easy. >> were they as uncomfortable as they looked sitting next to each other? >> yes. >> and what did you learn from that? >> well, i think that -- what can you say? they don't strike me as two guys that are -- can sit down in a room over a whiskey and kind of work things out. they're very locked in their ways and they are both political tacticians. that's what they do. >> they are brilliant political tacticians. anybody who knows senator mcconnell and reid knows that. they're both very good at what they do, and outmaneuvering one another, which raises the question, with no personal relationship and they're so politically far apart and beholden to their interests in the party, why should we expect that compromise will happen? >> i think that the future of the party, republican party very much depends on getting away from this view held by some in the public that they're just obstructionists. the other thing is that there are just too many things that are really impor
used to be the bulgaria of american politics and now we've turned into the paris. or that's how we feel. i would say on the whole, having talked to both sides repeatedly, they both insist that their trackings show their candidate up a point or two. and i have no reason to disbelieve them. that leads me to believe that it's very close. president obama would love to have virginia, because if he gets it, he really blocks most of the reasonable pathways to 270, assuming he keeps ohio and he's clearly ahead there. and governor romney really needs virginia. he's got to have it. >> speaking of gotting to have a state, let's go down to adam smith in florida. you guys had a poll out today, 51-45 that had romney ahead. this seems to be the same story that larry is hearing in virginia, i am hearing in florida, where the two sides insist they're ahead because they believe in two different worlds what the electorate is going to look like. >> i hear the same thing that both sides are convinced they are hearing, up by a point or two and this is a margin of error race. today was the last day of early v
say they uncovered an almost fully intact woolly mammoth excel will he ton near paris about the fifth such discovery on french soil. researchers say they found the remains along with thee andrea alcohol spearheads by accident site in a quarry. austria, fans from around the world gathered in mozart's vienna home for a concert by a russian pianist on the instrument mozart used for the last decade of his life. the keyboard back in that home for the first time since mozart's death since 1791. it now goes to the mozart's museum in sulsburg and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. cool critters now. a baboon has apparently adopted a stray kitten at the petting zoo in israel. zoo keepers say the tiny feline recently wandered into the monkey's cage and the two of them refuse to separate. the baboon carries the little one around and even cleans its fur. it's not complete paradise inside that pen though. there are reports of the baboon stealing the kitty cat's food. bargain hunters will barely have time for a turkey this thanksgiving. black friday on thursday? come on.
. a pair of school but pary for the longest the d. of temperatures of around 50, 51 tomorrowow. >> this weather report has been brought to you by walgreens. dan and bianna? >> thanks, ginger. >>> coming up on "good morning america," it's one thing to win the lottery. but how about driving around with the ticket in your car for months and not even knowing it. we're going to hear from the lucky winner who found out just in time. >>> and "beverly hills 90210" actress, jennie garth, is dating again. and one of her co-stars wants to be her wingman. that's next on "gma." keep it here. luckily, walgreens is here to help, with our new happy and healthy magazine, full of great new items for a boost of happiness, tips for staying healthy and sweet holiday deals to stay one step ahead. or at least try to. look for your free copy in the sunday newspaper and in stores, right here. at the corner of happy and healthy. a great clean doesn't have to take longer. i'm done. [ female announcer ] unlike sprays and dust rags, swiffer 360 dusters extender can clean hard to reach places in less time.
moment of the market, 2009, february 2009, we had the eve st. laurent sale in paris, world record prices achieved, $30, $40 million the worst part of the market. and that topped growth has been very much encouraging bidding, encouraging buying as well as encouraging great collectors to put their work on the market. so you've got not only great demand but you've got very good supply at the highest level. >> you know, behind you is andy warhol's "statue of liberty," we just showed it the estimate is about 35 million. do you think it might go for more than that and if so, where do you think the interest will come from, domestic or international? >> i think we will be looking at a market which is truly global. i think one of the things which has established the postwar contemporary market so much above any other market is fact we are not reliant on one economy. we are seeing very, very strong new emerging buyers coming out of the middle east, coming out of late.america and we have got the older collectors, very, very strong american. i think this is one of the things a bit of a fallacy you t
to berlin to paris, "half-blood blues" is esi edugyan's story of an afro german trumpet player and his band called the hot time swingers is in 1939 for occupied paris arrested by the nazis for the crime of being in africa german jazz musician. degenerate both by birth because he's one of the masters so-called produced by the unions of german women and french colonial soldiers after world war i and degenerate by choice because they considered jazz to be a degenerate art form, a quote on quote, jewish property. think about that. it's a figure of the novel which has been praised to the heavens which is a little exposed, i'm sorry, uses a little exposed corner of the african diaspora to address the themes of creativity as relations to the other and the very nature of those historical memory and historical discourse. the novel was powered not only by its flights from place to place and from person-to-person, but also, and i would say most impressively by esi edugyan's use of black vernacular language, the common language spoken by people has covered african-american fiction for more than a centu
from princeton, moved to paris, and was falling in love with her new city and a new boyfriend. and her life was turned upside down. we'll speak with her in a moment, but first, here's her story. >> i was diagnosed in 2011 when i was 22. i remember as he said the words, i remember reading them on the paper and just feeling my heart sink down to my stomach. >> it just felt like something stopped inside of me. >> i lived in paris. i had an apartment there, a job there. my boyfriend was there. and suddenly i was in new york with a cancer diagnosis not knowing if i was going to survive the next few weeks. i got my first treatments with an incredible team of doctors. unfortunately, the second part of the biopsy results showed that i would need a bone marrow transplant. >> when i found out that i could donate my bone marrow, i felt like i could actually do something to help her. and hopefully save her. >> i feel very connected to him in this very intense way. >> we were incredibly elated about hearing the good news that adam was a match, not only a match, but a perfect match. >> there i was,
the paris based national council which is made up of exiles has failed to win the support of the syria people but she said that any new leadership must protect the country from extremists. >> we also need an opposition that will be on record strongly resisting the efforts by extremists to hijack the revolution. >> the un, arab league special envoy met with the china foreign minister to try to stop the civil war. they said they are willing to work with the international community but that the future should be determined by the people. >>> the united states government may have known about security risks at the embassy in libya before the deadly attack that killed the ambassador. according to reports the united states mission held an emergency meeting less than a month before the attack. they discussed their fear that the embassy couldn't with stand a coordinated attack. officials also reportedly sent a classified cable to the secretary of state warning her about the concerns. >> this morning union city officially opens what it calls the new station center. that center will be a transi
just been thrown out. >> reporter: by the time the air france concord lifted off from paris, its left wing was already on fire. it was july 25th, 2000. 109 passengers and crew had only minutes to live. the plane crashed into a hotel, killing four more people on the ground. turns out a 16-inch metal strip lying on the runway brought down the concord. >> when the concord went over it, it hit the tire to a point where it then exploded. parts of the tire then went up into the fuel tank like shrapnel. >> reporter: the flying debris exploded the concord's fuel tanks. the metal piece that triggered the accident had fallen off a continental dc-10 and had been mistakenly installed by a continental mechanic. >> this was an accident. why the french courts got involved and tried to make a criminal case out of this, i will never understand. >> reporter: french courts held continental airlines criminally responsible and convicted its mechanic of manslaughter. but now a french appeals court has overturned that ruling, saying the mistake made by the continental mechanic did not amount to a crime. the
'm coming from paris in new jersey. i work in staten island but yesterday going home i was very low on gas so i stop and then park first and after an hour and a half to two hours waiting, i got to the gas station, unfortunately out of gas, there was no more gas. >> reporter: so he was here this morning. now along with power outages at the retail station, there are also power outages at the storage terminals in new jersey so that means the gasoline that's in those terminals can't be delivered to the stations. in addition the port of new york and new jersey is closed so gas can't be imported through that port, it has to go through alternatives and trucked in. in order to provide some relief, governor chris christie has waived basically a rule that prevents gasoline stations here in new jersey from buying gas from out of state dealers so that should provide some relief for residents. nevertheless, the relief isn't expected to come any time soon. expect some gas lines for a few days to come. if there's any good news, prices here at the vince lombardi station are only about five cents above the
had been there for and what she had nurtured us for. >> narrator: the mission in paris was leaderless. someone needed to turn it around, pull it all together. mitt took over. >> he immediately starts kind of establishing himself as a leader within the church because there's a vacuum. >> narrator: those closest to him say the experience had changed him. >> he made a commitment to himself to work as hard. and i think part of that comes from that experience of going overseas and seeing other people, and having life-threatening experiences and deciding that you're going to-what you're going to make out of your life. and he decided he wanted to make the most he could out of his life, and worked as hard as he possibly could to do that. >> narrator: by the early 1980s, barry obama had left hawaii and his grandparents behind. now he was on the mainland, in los angeles, at occidental college. they called it oxy. >> he was the most casual, unpretentious, nicest guy. i mean, my indelible image of him was always in a hawaiian shirt, and some op shorts and flip-flops. i don't know that he had a lo
's not the american farmer. >> a poster child for the estate tax would be paris hilton, celebrity, but also hotel repair res. >> currently the federal government taxes estates worth $5 million and up at 35%. when the bush era tax cuts expire in january, rates increase to 55% on estates of a million dollars or more. while some republicans want to eliminate the death tax entirely, the president proposes a 45% rate on estates of $3.5 million and up. >> if we are burdened with millions of dollars of estate tax, it forces the breakup of ranches and farms and it's not good for the environment. it's not good for future generations and it's not good for america in general. >> he paid the irs $2 million when he inherited the ranch decades ago. come january, the tax burden on his children would be more than 13 million. critics say 97% of family farms could be affected by the tax increase. supporters disagree and they argue the tax is needed to tax unrealized capital gains that are handed down family to family. the point is, estate tax is just another boulder in the fiscal cliff prepared to fall. back to yo
in jerusalem. again, you just returned from paris and you say much of the talk was about what's going on in the middle east. >> absolutely. the group i was with was john bolton and it was quite a group of the we were talking about the iranian group that wants to see regime change in iran. they've just been delisted. and the reality is that's an option that we should be talking about. there are three option. option number one is negotiate and do some kind of detante like question with the soviets. two, is military attacks. both of those are bad. the third is, let's see if you can get a different regime. after all, we have a different regime in egypt. we have a new one in libya. we're going to have a new one in syria. a lot of questions about what's going to replace them. in iran, you probably could replace them with a pretty solid pro-western government if you did the right things. >> brian: kind of encouraged that president obama said he does have words of support for israel. >> they're getting bombed every day. and it turns out this has been going on for some time of the two, three a
'oreal paris in betancourt. >>> 42 minutes past the hour. bonnie schneider has the thanksgiving forecast. it's looking pretty good out there. isn't it, bonnie? >> it is. we're watching out for windy weather, alina. that holds true from bismarck to minneapolis. wind gusts could be as strong as 48 miles per hour. in parts offed in we're also facing snow. so blowing and drifting snow from areas of grand forks into fargo. it's going to be a little bit messy for your thanksgiving day travels. gusts will be climbing up to 45 miles per hour. elsewhere across the country, we're also tracking dense fog. so clouds on the ground from paducah, kentucky, cape girardeau, to memphis, tennessee. low clouds. i think it will improve by 9:00 am. if you are flying today -- many of you are trying to catch that early flight in time for your tirky. in minneapolis and soelt where we've had rain showers and low clouds. where it's not raining, millions of people will be out and about. new york city. the parade weather looks fantastic this year. bright sunshine and temperatures in the 40s. climbing into the low 50s fo
. this year the windows show a brief film, minnie imagining herself at the fashion shows in paris, and with a little pixie dust, she's transported to the runway. even style maven sarah jessica parker gets the cartoon treatment. >> by the way you have beautiful ears. >> oh, thank you. >> reporter: she was there for the unveiling with our boss, disney ceo bob iver. sjp weighing in on the controversial skinny minnie. >> but it's a fantasy. we imagine ourselves in a scenario much different from our own, fashion magazines and fashion has the saime aspirational quality. >> reporter: iver hopes it serves as a way to keep the characters on the cutting edge of style. >> we're presenting the marriage between disney characters and high fashion and proves that great character is kind of timeless and always in style. >> reporter: and it's for a good cause as 25% of the proceeds of the disney/barney's holiday fashion line will go to the red cross to help victims of hurricane sandy. and fear not, disney devotees. as with all fairy-tales, this story also has a happy ending. paula faris, abc news,
or paris or korea and you start pointing out that now, we are not as good, it will create a sense of maybe there is a complacent view that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence don't see their own kids life is not at all. we need to create some awareness that this is a serious challenge for our country and sadly is changing who we are as a nation where the singer could edit a page as well. >> a project underway, a really good one and also the common core assessments and how your child is doing in relation. we hope world-class standards. at the same time, however, got a smug, suburban constituents the end in the schools that are also grown in the policy makers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum, teaching to the test. you've got a complacent constituency in grumpy teachers. how does the reformer prevail? [laughter] >> well, you know, i think i mentioned this to you, we have to look at this new core of people coming into the profession and that kind of won't run in and dismissive t
during the seeing of paris providing political and humanitarian support. q & a sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >>> former florida governor jeb bush called for higher education standards in the u.s. delivering opening remarks for the town dangers fifth annual summit on education reform. the two-day summit is host bid the foundation for excellence. it includes education secretary an knee duncan and state policy makers inspect is thirty minutes. [applause] good morning, everybody. it is with great pride i'm going to introduce governor bush this morning. we met a over twenty five years ago, i don't think he has it on the rÉsume still, i was in tallahassee and i helped recruit move jeb to tallahassee in 1986 and i don't think he has forgiven me for that. but he was a secretary of commerce, as you may remember for a couple of years, and after i negotiated salary then governor elect renegotiated his salary not upward but downward, as it turns out that's why he doesn't like me. we blame friends as he served in the administration and in 1993, twenty years ago after coming off of the statewide ca
for the rest of us. >> reporter: in paris they voted with their palates piggott an obama burger against a romney omelette and the town in japan declared obama for obama and in kenya where obama's father is from women have been giving thai newborns, the latest michelle obama, brian obama. >> we are now extremely excited. we are happy. >> reporter: in a village of kogelo his step-grandmother sarah said he's worked hard. people on the rest of this planet celebrating their vote for ones they couldn't cast. world markets also responded positively this morning, and only hours after winning his next term, obama got his first order of foreign business courtesy of british prime minister david cameron saying he wants obama's help to do more to protect the people of syria, put more pressure on the assad regime and assist the rebels. savannah. >> just one in a long to-do list for the president. thanks, michelle. >>> coming up next, big issue in the election, jobs. how to find them no matter what your age. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back now at 8:44. this morning on "today's money,"
scientists found an almost complete skeleton of a woolly mammoth. near paris. >> wow. >> this is a rare find in france. they've named it helmet. it could be anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 years old. how do you say cool in french? helmut. i bet they don't call it helmet. but it's spelled helmut. >> thank you, christine. quite a find. 19 minutes past the hour. musical glove is teaching people how to play the piano just by wearing it. >> this could help people with spinal cord injuries regain their hands. joe carter has this technovags. >> wearing a glove may not make a dance like michael jackson. but it could teach you how to play music. >> this is the music tough glove. it's going to teach you how to play a piano melody without you paying attention to it. >> reporter: created by students and professors at georgia tech the glove uses vibration to teach your fingers the notes of a song. so you're going to teach me how to play o susannah. i've got zero experience. never played before. >> we will have you wear the glove for hopefully around 30 minutes or so. you can be reading your e-mail or jog
the french kept calling churchill as the germans were pouring through the line and racing towards paris. and the french generals reassuring churchill day after day, week after week that the french were putting up a brave defense had they knew the war was already lost, please, slowly repeat what you just said and hopefully conservatives will go back and look at what commentators and websites said over the past three weeks when they knew this race was lost. >> they have -- i'll say it again in exactly the same words. the conservative followership has been exploited, fleeced and lied to by the entertainment complex. >> name names. >> because of that -- i name names in the book. >> i don't think that's even necessary. >> and there are too many to name. but because the followers, the donors and the activists are so mistaken about the nature of the problems the country faces, the nature -- i mean, just a simple question. i went to tea party rallies. and i would ask this question. have taxes gone up or down in the past four years? they could not answer that question correctly. now, it's true,
society debut at crillon ball in paris. she's every bit the great-niece of jfk, who at the same age worked at the american embassy in london, traveled through south america and received a purple heart for his valor during the navy during world war ii. no purple heart for kick, but "town & country" says she is the niece that jackie would have loved. >> i think so. and lindsay lohan wasn't available. so we had to go with what we could get. >> had to go there. >> just kidding. yeah, i think she's great. i have to commend your pronunciation of the crillon ball. impressive for a guy from alabama. >> i try to go there at least every other year. >> kick is great. i think we're at a moment where the kennedys keep on coming at you. joe iii is back in congress taking over barney frank's seat. kick is emerging in a little different vein as a kennedy who doesn't really want to go into politics but is spending most of her time in l.a. and working for her father's cause with clean water. >> she's out of the family business. >> it looks like it. you know, they always seem to get sucked back in. so she st
is pushing the eurozone into a new recession. oecd joining us from paris. good morning. we have a huge debate in this country about austerity and what it means. reading your new report, will seems to be a suggestion that the austerity in europe is actually holding things back. is that right? >> the thrust of the report shows that number one there is a need that the united states don't go over the fiscal cliff. but also that if you don't, there is growth in the united states and that in fact is the area that will be recovering faster. second, in the case of europe, good news, the greek package yesterday, thousand we still have to address institutional issues having to deal with countries under pressure like spain or italy, and of course solving the whole of the debt problems and getting all the elements of the machinery in place, a bazooka has to be fully loaded ready to fire, are made k markets have to know the bazooka is there in case there is greater volatility. but there is institutional progress, but we see a 2013, 4 2014 scenario of slow growth, sluggish growth, picking up a little in
on a flight to paris. >> think i'm running on a little bit of adrenaline right now. >> reporter: no time for the eiffel tower, only an hour before leaving for salt lake city, another 12 hours in the air. >> 54 1/2 hours in. >> reporter: we caught up with him in utah where there was one flight to go, salt lake to baltimore. in all howie traveled a mind-blowing 14,000 miles and with elite bonuses he's earned 30,000 plus, enough to propel him to delta's diamond level in 2013 and he'll eventually to use those miles to travel for free. >> there are hundreds of thousands of people that do this. >> reporter: howie blogs about his travel tricks and says the online forum on flyertalk.com is a treasure trove for extreme frequent flyers who constantly monitor new fares for low cost long hauls. >> we're trying to beat the system. been to 65 different countries using these techniques. >> reporter: the frugal travel guy hosts seminars on how to travel on the cheap, like the atlanta to honolulu trip he took with wife kate for $152 round trip. >> he loves the game. he loves the chase. >> reporter: and c
martin, coordinator of tea pary patriots. >> for those of us that believe that america is founded is the greatest country in the history of the world we wanted someone would fight for us. we wanted a fighter like ronald reagan that boldly championed america's founding principles who inspired millions of independence and ronald reagan democrats to join us and the idea that america was founded was the shining city upon a hill. will we got was a week moderate candidate hand-picked by the beltway elites in the country, the establishment of the republican party. the presidential loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss of the republican elite handpicked candidates, the tea party is the last best hope america has to restore her founding principles. while that may take longer to restore these principles with president obama back in office, we are not going away. it took nearly 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than three and a half years to restore our constitution. we are going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution, and w
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